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countroryangelini | 12:53 PM BREXIT – all we need to know

BREXIT – The Latest News

  • Passport applications from UK almost double after Brexit vote 18 Dec 2017 10:27 Irish Times Nearly twice as many people in the United Kingdom are applying for Irish passports this year, than before the British voted to leave the European Union. To date this year 81,287 passport applications have been made from Britain, and another 80,964 from …
  • Brexit Talks Show Progress for Brits Abroad 18 Dec 2017 10:24 Daily The EU and UK must ensure citizens’ rights remain a key priority and guarantee all the remaining rights of 1.2mn UK citizens living in the EU during Phase Two of the Brexit negotiations, according to leading citizens’ rights campaign group, British in …
  • Risk of 'dirty' turkey after Brexit if UK strikes trade deal with USA 18 Dec 2017 10:17 Farmers Guardian The UK and EU approach insists that hygiene standards in the supply chain are sufficiently high that they do not need to be chemically disinfected.   Statistics cited in the briefing paper show that 97 per cent of chicken breast meat in the USA contains …
  • Tory rebels 'urge soft Brexit alliance with Labour' 18 Dec 2017 10:14 Charleston Daily Mail Theresa May suffered a first stinging defeat on EU Withdrawal Bill last week Eleven Tory rebels joined forces with Labour, the SNP and the Lib Dems in vote Some rebels now urging the PM to forge cross party alliance for 'soft Brexit' By James …
  • PM's 'war Cabinet' meets to hammer out Brexit plan 18 Dec 2017 10:10 Charleston Daily Mail Theresa May is gathering her Brexit 'war Cabinet' today as she braces for bruising trade talks with the EU. The Prime Minister and key members of her team are hammering out a vision of what 'end state' they want to achieve. The crucial …
  • Ministers meet to thrash out Brexit 18 Dec 2017 09:36 BBC Image copyright Reuters Theresa May and her senior ministers are to formally discuss for the first time what the UK's long-term relationship with the EU should be. The EU has agreed that Brexit negotiations can now move on to discussing the UK and the …
  • Iain Duncan Smith says British business will just have to 'get by' with harder trade after Brexit 18 Dec 2017 09:28 Business Insider Iain Duncan Smith: "British business will have to learn to get by in a different world." Carl Court / Getty Iain Duncan Smith says business will just have to adjust to more difficult trade with the EU. Former Conservative leader acknowledges …
  • 'We should be far more ambitious': UK banks fear a Canada-style Brexit trade deal 18 Dec 2017 09:28 Business Insider Office blocks of Citi, Barclays, and HSBC banks are seen at dusk in the Canary Wharf financial district in London, Britain November 16, 2017. REUTERS/Toby Melville A lobby group for UK banks want the government to seek a Brexit deal that includes …
  • 'No way' - Barnier says UK will not be allowed bespoke Brexit trade deal - Politics live 18 Dec 2017 09:23 Investing.com Among the most waspish and patronising, but not untrue, things said about the government’s Brexit strategy recently was this comment from the Irish prime minister Leo Varadkar. Speaking last month at an EU meeting in Sweden, he said: It’s 18 months since …
  • Hundreds in Leeds join ‘Brexit Resistance’ movement 18 Dec 2017 09:10 Yorkshire Evening Post Hundreds of people in Leeds have joined the ‘Brexit Resistance’ to keep the UK in the EU. “If a democracy cannot change its mind, it ceases to be a democracy.” These words for inspiration for those in Leeds campaigning to stop Britain’s imminent departure …
  • GBP/USD: EU Leaders Agreed To Move To Second Phase Of Brexit Talks 18 Dec 2017 09:06 Investing.com For the 24 hours to 23:00 GMT, the GBP declined 0.76% against the USD and closed at 1.3322 on Friday, after the European Union (EU) leaders agreed to move on to the second phase of Brexit negotiations, but warned that the second phase will be …
  • Theresa May Insists She Will Try to Sign New Trade Deals Before Brexit Transition is Over 18 Dec 2017 09:05 Novinite.com Theresa May will insist on Monday that she will try to sign new free trade deals during the UK’s Brexit transition period, setting herself on a collision course with Brussels, The Independent reported. Ms May will tell the House of Commons she will …
  • Britain 'has to face the consequences' of Brexit warns Michel Barnier 18 Dec 2017 09:05 Metro Cafe Michel Barnier, the European Chief Negotiator on Brexit has warned the UK it won’t get a unique deal (Picture: EPA)Britain must ‘face the consequences’ of deciding to leave the European Union, Brexit’s chief negotiator Michel Barnier has said. Any hopes …
  • Brexit trade talks to shape pound’s prospects 18 Dec 2017 08:58 Economic Times Pound traders are about to get their first insight into how the currency may fare in the next phase of the Brexit talks as negotiators move on to the potentially more complicated stage of discussing trade. Sterling may be vulnerable as UK Prime Minister …
  • The new Brexit divide 18 Dec 2017 08:50 The Spectator ‘Remain’ and ‘Leave’ is no longer the basis of the divide over Brexit, says the Daily Telegraph. Instead, the new split is over to what extent post-Brexit Britain should ‘mirror what the EU does on trade and services’ or whether the UK should ‘plough its …
  • Risk of 'dirty' turkey after Brexit if UK strikes a US trade deal 18 Dec 2017 08:00 Medical Xpress Consumers could be eating "dirty" chlorinated turkey at Christmas if the UK agrees a post-Brexit trade deal with the USA, according to a new briefing paper by leading food policy experts. The team - from the University of Sussex, Cardiff …
  • The Brexit Mess Proves Its Supporters Correct 18 Dec 2017 07:54 Daily Caller In an attempt to break the deadlock in the ongoing Brexit negotiations between the United Kingdom and the European Union, the United Kingdom has agreed to give in on key negotiating positions. According to estimates, the bill for leaving the union will …
  • Conservative rebels urge May to form cross-party alliance for soft Brexit 18 Dec 2017 07:32 The Guardian Conservative backbench rebels who defeated the government last week are urging Theresa May to reach out to Labour MPs and form a cross-party alliance for a soft Brexit. As May’s Brexit team prepares to debate Britain’s future relationship with the EU on …
  • 'Soft Brexit?': Theresa May to Discuss EU Divorce with Full Cabinet 18 Dec 2017 07:30 Sputnik International Europe 10:10 18.12.2017(updated 10:11 18.12.2017) Get short URL Buoyed by an EU green light for a second stage of Brexit talks, British Prime Minister Theresa May is now facing calls from a number of Tory backbenchers to form a cross-party alliance with …
  • ‘Shared market’ Brexit model proposed by think-tank 18 Dec 2017 07:28 The Irish Times Britain and the EU can permanently align their rules after Brexit, with a mechanism to allow some divergence in exchange for compensation, an influential think-tank has suggested. The centre-left Institute for Public Policy Research will present its …

Source: BBC.co.uk

What does Brexit mean?
It is a word that has become used as a shorthand way of saying the UK leaving the EU – merging the words Britain and exit to get Brexit, in a same way as a possible Greek exit from the euro was dubbed Grexit in the past.
Why is Britain leaving the European Union?
A referendum – a vote in which everyone (or nearly everyone) of voting age can take part – was held on Thursday 23 June, to decide whether the UK should leave or remain in the European Union. Leave won by 52% to 48%. The referendum turnout was 71.8%, with more than 30 million people voting.

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cameron-brexit-angelinipost-com

What was the breakdown across the UK?

England voted for Brexit, by 53.4% to 46.6%, as did Wales, with Leave getting 52.5% of the vote and Remain 47.5%. Scotland and Northern Ireland both backed staying in the EU. Scotland backed Remain by 62% to 38%, while 55.8% in Northern Ireland voted Remain and 44.2% Leave.

Theresa May. The former home secretary took over from David Cameron, who resigned on the day after losing the referendum. Like Mr Cameron, Mrs May was against Britain leaving the EU but she says she will respect the will of the people. She has said “Brexit means Brexit” but there is still a lot of debate about what that will mean in practice especially on the two key issues of how British firms do business in the European Union and what curbs are brought in on the rights of European Union nationals to live and work in the UK.

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teresa-may-speech-at-conservative-party-conference-angelinipost.com

The UK economy appears to have weathered the initial shock of the Brexit vote, although the value of the pound remains near a 30-year low, but opinion is sharply divided over the long-term effects of leaving the EU. Some major firms such as Easyjet and John Lewis have pointed out that the slump in sterling has increased their costs.

Britain also lost its top AAA credit rating, meaning the cost of government borrowing will be higher. But share prices have recovered from a dramatic slump in value, with both the FTSE 100 and the broader FTSE 250 index, which includes more British-based businesses, trading higher than before the referendum.

The Bank of England is hoping its decision to cut interest rates from 0.5% to 0.25% – a record low and the first cut since 2009 – will stave off recession and stimulate investment, with some economic indicators pointing to a downturn.

The European Union – often known as the EU – is an economic and political partnership involving 28 European countries . It began after World War Two to foster economic co-operation, with the idea that countries which trade together are more likely to avoid going to war with each other.

It has since grown to become a “single market” allowing goods and people to move around, basically as if the member states were one country. It has its own currency, the euro, which is used by 19 of the member countries, its own parliament and it now sets rules in a wide range of areas – including on the environment, transport, consumer rights and even things such as mobile phone charges.

For the UK to leave the EU it has to invoke an agreement called Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty which gives the two sides two years to agree the terms of the split. Theresa May has said she intends to trigger this process by the end of March 2017, meaning the UK will be expected to have left by the summer of 2019, depending on the precise timetable agreed during the negotiations.

Once negotiations officially begin, we will start to get a clear idea of what kind of deal the UK will seek from the EU, on trade and immigration.

The government will also enact a Great Repeal Bill which will end the primacy of EU law in the UK. It is expected to incorporate all EU legislation into UK law in one lump, after which the government will decide over a period of time, which parts to keep, change or retain.

Theresa May set up a government department, headed by veteran Conservative MP and Leave campaigner David Davis, to take responsibility for Brexit. Former defence secretary, Liam Fox, who also campaigned to leave the EU, was given the new job of international trade secretary and Boris Johnson, who was a leader of the official Leave campaign, is foreign secretary.

These men – dubbed the Three Brexiteers – will play a central role in negotiations with the EU and seek out new international agreements, although it will be Mrs May, as prime minister, who will have the final say.

How long will it take for Britain to leave the EU?

Once Article 50 has been triggered, the UK will have two years to negotiate its withdrawal. But no one really knows how the Brexit process will work – Article 50 was only created in late 2009 and it has never been used.

Former Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond, now Chancellor, wanted Britain to remain in the EU, and he has suggested it could take up to six years for the UK to complete exit negotiations. The terms of Britain’s exit will have to be agreed by 27 national parliaments, a process which could take some years, he has argued.

EU law still stands in the UK until it ceases being a member.

What do “soft” and “hard” Brexit mean?

These terms are increasingly being used as debate focuses on the terms of the UK’s departure from the EU. There is no strict definition of either, but they are used to refer to the closeness of the UK’s relationship with the EU post-Brexit.

So at one extreme, “hard” Brexit could involve the UK refusing to compromise on issues like the free movement of people in order to maintain access to the EU single market. At the other end of the scale, a “soft” Brexit might follow a similar path to Norway, which is a member of the single market and has to accept the free movement of people as a result.

Thank you BBC for more click here

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